10 best audiobooks to listen to this month (January 2022)

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Photo-Illustration: Vulture; Photos by editors

The audiobook category is growing every day, and we certainly can’t listen to everything. The goal of this monthly column is to direct you to audiobooks that we hope will provide the best experiences, pop culture value, and something to say at your cocktail party.

Photo: Editor

Read by: Brittany Pressley and Ryan West
Length: 10 hours, 17 minutes
Speed ​​I listened to: 2.2x

Colleen Hoover’s books are on bestseller lists everywhere thanks to BookTok, which I hope someone will explain to me soon so I can be a #BookTok influencer. My Pilates teacher told me to read it too. I started by listening to this, his latest. It’s a novel about Kenna, fresh out of prison for killing her ex-boyfriend in a car accident, who mistakenly sparks a romance with her ex’s best friend, Ledger, that she had never met before. Also, Kenna gave birth to her ex’s daughter in prison, and now that the daughter is 5 years old, she hopes they can reunite. Surprisingly, it all makes sense, and I kind of enjoyed the casual, alternate storytelling of Pressley (as Kenna) and West (as Ledger). Plus: I laughed more times while I did in both seasons of Emily in Paris, and I’m considering changing my name to Ledger.

Photo: Editor

Read by: Laurent Ambroise
Length: 9 hours, 37 minutes
Speed ​​I listened to: 1.8x

This is a totally decent thriller elevated by surprisingly good storytelling. It’s about a hotel maid named Molly who is almost uncomfortably devoted to her job and stumbles upon the corpse of a wealthy man in a suite. This leads to unraveling other harmful events. Molly is on the spectrum, so her interactions with people tend to be awkward. We know Ambrose from Six feet Under ground and a recent revival of my lovely lady, but for me at least, she’s really disappeared into the characters, which also include the dead man’s socialite and a hotel bartender’s hunk. Ambrose has no long resume in audiobooks, but now I’m inclined to follow her anywhere.

Photo: Editor

Read by: The author
Length: 11 hours, 40 minutes
Speed ​​I listened to: 2x

I believe you can never have too much Logan Roy. Cox’s memoir unwinds a bit, as if Hannibal Lecter (which Cox played in 1986 man hunterlisten)) was a Shakespearean actor. Occasionally, Cox is about to stick the knife into a co-worker, but before he stabs, he slips the knife back into its sheath. Steven Seagal and Johnny Depp don’t get away with it so easily. I especially enjoyed Cox occasionally laughing at his own jokes and his bashing of Gary Oldman and darkest hour, mainly because it eclipsed his Churchill biopic in 2017.

Photo: Editor

Read by: Edoardo Ballerini
Length: 4 hours, 53 minutes
Speed ​​I listened to: 1.7x

I picked this on a whim, partly because I like a short audiobook to add to my annual report Good Reads Challenge. I was captivated from the first five minutes. This is partly due to (a) the slightly offbeat homoerotic subtext, i.e. a poor man meets a wealthy movie class buddy at the airport, who regales him with a story that he “never told anyone else”; (b) the milieu of the Los Angeles art gallery scene, in which much of the book takes place, including dinner at Mr. Chow Beverly Hills; and (c) Ballerini’s intense and sometimes edgy portrayal of those two guys laughing in the airport lounge. At times it reminded me (in a good way) of David Cale’s Ripley-esque monologue Harry Clark, which starred Billy Crudup and lives as a spectacular audio recording using Audible.

Photo: Editor

Read by: The author and Shiromi Arserio
Length: 15 hours, 24 minutes
Speed ​​I listened to: 2.2x

i think i know what Haley, the creator of Fargo and Legion on FX, tries to make this novel his sixth, but it’s filled with so many contemporary issues that sometimes I get lost in my own unease. COVID-19, Jeffrey Epstein, human trafficking, the sham of politics, climate change, opioid addiction, ALS and teenage suicide (many of the latter) all tie into the plot in one way or another. That said, I had a hard time turning Anthem off, less because of Arserio’s respectable narration (although I want to know how these characters all ended) and more for the weird semi-autobiographical interstitial tirades read by Hawley himself. They’re pretty effective and chilling Hitchcockian meta interludes, if that’s a thing.

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Read by: The author, Ted Danson, and a handful of other voice actors you might recognize.
Length: 9 hours, 42 minutes
Speed ​​I listened to: 1.9x

Schur is another showrunner struggling with what it means to be a person in 2022. He writes that by researching The right place, he became super interested in the division between good and bad, right and wrong. It uses thinkers throughout history with the voice of self-proclaimed “national treasure” Ted Danson to explore a variety of complex nuances of theoretical and real-life situations. The book doesn’t really start cooking with gas until Schur tells a story involving his wife, Hurricane Katrina, and a damaged car bumper. To cope with the multitude of footnotes, the audiobook uses a chime to denote the start and end of each footnote. I thought it was pretty perfect. Perfect too: the pretty pronunciation of “Sartre” by Schur.

Photo: Editor

Read by: Tashi Thomas
Length: 4 hours, 27 mins
Speed ​​I listened to: 1.5x

I saw this book everywhere in early January, so I decided to give it a try. The “we” perspective immediately gave me vibes of virgins who committed suicide, which of course I love. There are many protagonists, so Thomas basically reads like a collective of “brown girls” from a neighborhood in Queens, many of whom go in opposite directions to each other. There is something so undulating in the language that one often has the impression of listening to poetry; telling you about it is a potentially optimal preference. That said, sometimes the stories and the words fly by in a fleeting moment, so you might want to read it too.

Photo: Editor

Read by: Eva Kaminsky
Length: 10 hours, 29 minutes
Speed ​​I listened to: 1.65x

The common thread of this thriller, which takes place in 1999, is the murder of a stripper. It’s told from different points of view, including a tenacious club dancer who goes by Gigi, the detectives on the case, and even the murderer. It’s the kind of production that usually enjoys a few different readers, but Kaminsky’s compelling storytelling has never lost me. I kept my ears open until the startling ending. An interview after the audio between Kaminsky and Rutkoski (who previously wrote YA) provides a particularly chilling insight into the genesis of the story.

Photo: Editor

Read by: The author
Length: 7 hours
Speed ​​I listened to: 1.5x

Every now and then I come across a self-help book that really helps me, and I want to share it with everyone I know. (I’m nice like that.) I’m sure I’m not the only one who’s afraid to get things done, whether it’s paying my late Amex bill or working on the novel I don’t have. haven’t looked in 24 months. Golden and her brilliant Aussie accent eased some of my guilt. The advice is not revolutionary here. “Shrug your shoulders and carry on” is one of Dore’s suggestions. But anyone who uses the word “fruitful” to describe how we’d like our days to be (i.e. more productive) and then tells me to “embrace the higgledy-piggledy” is definitely a keeper.

Photo: Editor

Read by: The author
Length: 6 hours, 47 minutes
Speed ​​I listened to: 1.5x

My brother turned me on Children’s Baking Championship during the confinement, which rekindled my curiosity for Bertinelli. As a judge, she always clashes with the fact that young contestants know she likes anything lemon flavored. Her storytelling is engaging from the start in this new memoir, which covers her love of cooking, her struggles with her weight, and the 2020 death of her ex-husband Eddie Van Halen, with whom she has remained quite close. She speaks very fast, so it is difficult to listen to these memoirs quickly. It might have helped me ignore some of the repetitive moments in the book. But the Hot in Cleveland The star had me laughing after announcing, “Written and read by me, Valerie Bertinelli,” backed only by her use of the term “wackadoodle.”

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